iPhone Data Analysis

By Kristina

Got inspired by the MTBoS when I saw a tweet from Tina:

It made me think of an activity that I did for data analysis this year, focusing on the statement of inquiry: “How quantities are represented can establish underlying trends or relationships in a population.” We had learned measures of central tendency, stem-and-leaf plots, box plots, bar graphs, and histograms, so I was curious how they would apply these types of data analysis when given this statement of inquiry.

I asked the students what they thought the three most popular apps were for teens and the amount of time they estimated teens spent on those apps. They gave estimates like “Snapchat – 60 hours, Instagram – 70 hours, Facebook – 80 hours.” I then taught them how to find the time spent on iPhone apps, like this:

We collected data for all the iPhone users in 9th grade and then from staff members who were willing to share their usage data. I turned them loose with just these directions: “1) Analyze the data set for trends, using the math we have learned so far for data analysis. 2) Analyze the predictions people made. How close were the predictions?” For them, the hardest part was learning how to focus their analysis around subgroups of people (e.g., teens vs adults, females vs males) or around apps of their choices (e.g., one girl grouped all music apps as one category).

Leave a Reply