Posts Tagged ‘MTBos’

MTBoS Week 4: sharing a lesson

By Kristina

mylesson

It feels good to be back at school! Here’s my 9th grade math lesson from day 2 (the first day of Coordinate Geometry), for the two 47-minute sections.

Day 1: 1-a Distance Formula
1) Name Graphs: Check off completion. [This assignment was to have students write their names on graph paper using only straight lines that begin and end at coordinate points on a grid.] Have 3 students draw a letter of their names on the board with points labeled.
2) Practice Quiet Coyote [my routine for getting attention–his ears are open but his mouth is shut]
3) Mini-Lesson: Distance Formula [taught using the 3 student examples]
– Look at how to solve for vertical and horizontal line distances.
– Look at diagonal distances to introduce the distance formula. Elicit the right triangle shape and Pythagorean Theorem.
4) Practice using Kuta worksheet (start with lines drawn on a grid, then ordered pairs). Introduce distance formula.
5) Formative Assessment: Plickers Exit Ticket (1 multiple problem with two ordered pairs) via Kuta multiple choice. Students turn their sheets and cards to the inbox.
6) HW: Haese & Harris Exercise 5A1 (answer key included)
7) Support for Math Enrichment: Extra WS practice. Give feedback on ET.

Reflection
Section 1: Students were slow to take out paper for notes and turn in HW. We need to make this process more automatic. I noticed that many needed prompting to label the notes with the skill and the date, or even to use their binders (which seem to have grown into a pile in the back of my room over the semester I was out on maternity leave). Some students do have some excellent, organized notes from the past semester, so I might start having students volunteer to share their notes for my “absent work” binder to help absent kids catch up. I forgot to practice Quiet Coyote explicitly but the quieting was better today. For the practice, students really had enough time for the first four problems (mostly because they got stuck with simplifying radicals–the answer key had listed the square root of 8 as 2 square root of 2). I had to write more directions for the close of class on the board to clarify what I wanted for the exit ticket (for example, students didn’t realize they had to turn in their work as well as the Plickers cards). I need to label the Plickers cards with the student names for both sections and make sure they go into a separate bin.

Section 2: This lesson went smoother overall because of anticipating cueing of the HW checking process (in which I handed Plickers cards out to save time later), prepping them to segway from a picture to two ordered pairs, and completing the exit ticket. More students completed the ordered pairs questions, but we will still review. A principal intern came in to observe my class, and it was good to hear this feedback: “Thank you for allowing me to come observe your class today and welcome back!! I liked that you put the answers on the back of the sheet so that they could self check, it fostered more discussion than I would have thought. The students were so engaged. It was interesting to listen to a couple of conversations where the student answer didn’t match the back and so the next step was to ask a partner about what they had come to and why. Plus those Plicker cards were awesome – such a great way to use technology without the lag time. I had never seen that before but I will be sure to remember it for a high tech/low complication formative assessment measure.”

my favorite: trig tale

By Kristina

myfav

I originally chose to teach math because I thought that it’d be so cut-and-dry, with one right answer for everything. Eight years later, I find myself looking for ways to assess that have multiple right answers. A recent conversation with two of my best college friends reminded me of that, and led me to pick trig tale for my favorite. One of those friends is a German teacher, and she likes to give open-ended quiz questions that are unlike the typical matching ones. In a recent class, some students got quite agitated at the question “How was your last report card of freshman year?” One student said “but what do you want me to say? that the report card was good?” because she hadn’t studied for that (and probably couldn’t ask fellow students “so what’d you get for number 5?” after class). My friend could tell if they knew the vocabulary if the response made sense, and would have been fine with multiple answers. Another best (but non-teacher friend) piped up and said that in one of her favorite high school English classes, you could get 100% on any paper as long as you could justify your reasoning.

That’s why I like to do these projects in spite of the bigger grading effort that they require. Sometimes students protest the open-ended nature of this and claim they want to just do math problems instead, but they end up getting really into the story lines and figuring how to use the trig in ways that advance the story well. My mentor teacher used this during my student teaching year, and I find that creativity and fairy tales stand the test of time even as technology permeates ever more of the classroom. Though I do appreciate the many ways this could be done on the computer, sometimes it’s just fun to kick it old-school with construction paper and crayons.

trigtales

The Description

The goal of this project is to have you develop a creative fairy tale that shows your understanding of the trigonometry skills from this unit. You may work with 1 or 2 classmates to outline the story, draft it, and illustrate it in class.

1) Unit Skills (32 points)

Your trig tale must demonstrate the following skills (4 points each, similar to quiz rubric).

Right Triangle Word Problems:
1. Find Missing Angle in Right Triangle
2. Find Missing Side in Right Triangle
3. Find Missing Angle in 3-D Figure
4. Find Missing Side in 3-D Figure

Oblique Triangle Word Problems
5. Apply Sine Rule to Find Missing Angle
6. Apply Sine Rule to Find Missing Side
7. Apply Cosine Rule to Find Missing Angle
8. Apply Cosine Rule to Find Missing Side

2) Writing, Illustrations, and Organization (22 points)

Elements of Fairy Tales (from http://www.readwritethink.org)
– Set in the past—usually significantly long ago. May be presented as historical fact from the past.
– Include fantasy, supernatural or make-believe aspects.
– Typically incorporate clearly defined good characters and evil characters.
– May include objects, people, or events in threes.
– Focus the plot on a problem or conflict that needs to be solved.
– Often have happy endings, based on the resolution of the conflict or problem.
– Usually teach a lesson or demonstrate values important to one’s culture.

The Rubric: TrigTaleRubric

2016 Blogging Initiative, Week 1

By Kristina

onegoodthing

Option 1: We rarely take the time to stop and smell the roses. Even on the most disastrous of days, good things happen. And these good things, when you’re on the lookout for them, pop up. All. The. Time. So for one day (heck, do it for many days), keep a lookout for the small good moments during your day and blog about them. We bet that by keeping an eye out for the good, your whole day will be even better!

2016-01-12 19.08.39 My one good thing! He’s overseeing my blogging from his “office.”

I’m in the home stretch of maternity leave with my son Parker, so as much as I wanted to share what a day looks like for me teaching math and being an IB coordinator, it feels weird trying to recreate that when I haven’t been in the classroom since June 25, 2015. In the throes of the newborn stage, I quickly realized that there is no “leave” in maternity leave. I missed school–not only the familiar faces and routines but also the feeling of being competent. As a student and as a runner, I’ve previously been able to achieve good grades and better race times. With a known input comes a known output.

But with motherhood, like teaching before it, I have felt so deskilled in that putting hard work in doesn’t necessarily yield a desired result. It’s been a humbling journey, and though each day brings new challenges, I’m starting to find my footing. Over the past few months, I have grown by leaps and bounds since that first day home with Parker (when my husband and I put the car seat down on our floor for the very first time and wondered “how did the hospital let us out when we know *nothing*?”). I feel more confident with taking him out, with soothing him, with feeling like a mom, and with knowing him and his quirks. I cherish our snuggles, outings to baby lapsit, long walks, and co-cooking sessions (when he oversees me from his lion seat). Watching him grow and learn is amazing. Laughs, rolling, grasping, and getting closer to sitting up are all so cool to see.

That leads me to the overall “one good thing” of this post. Being at home with Parker and enjoying these small moments is helping me be patient with where I am rather than always worrying about not doing enough. When I got pregnant, I knew that teaching would become very different as I took on the new role of mom. However, I kept up my old habits and work style right up until the summer because I just wasn’t ready to let go of them and change. Throughout maternity leave, I’ve worried about forgetting how to teach, about my school not needing me anymore, and about how I was going to handle work if Parker still woke up multiple times a night to feed. Recently, I finally started to change my mindset about the onset of work. My brain sometimes still thinks it needs to go into panicky worry mode before every start of school, even though it doesn’t need to do it anymore.

Life will be okay if I’m reasonable about setting my bars for success. For instance, I recently ran without RunKeeper or music and just set out to enjoy the run without setting a pace goal. I could have gone into it saying “well, you *already* failed because you also didn’t double up and do a barre class today” or “if you don’t go faster than your last run, you’ve failed” or “you’re not running five miles at a time yet? FAILED!” Instead I just enjoyed the balmy weather, quiet Tufts campus, and feeling happy for having gone on a run at all. Teaching is going to be fine. It’ll be a tough adjustment, much as getting used to maternity leave was, but I’ll be able to handle it.