Posts Tagged ‘one good thing’

one good thing: friends and puzzles

By Kristina

Today I’m grateful for a fellow mom-friend who said “want to come over and hang out?” when I mentioned that my husband was in Denmark for a business trip. Though interacting with folks via Facebook, Twitter, and text message does offer some solace when at home with an infant, it doesn’t replace the calming effect of in-person time. We chatted a bunch while playing with our babies (who have known each other since ~6-8 weeks of age but only recently recognized each other’s existence). She mentioned that she would be doing Mystery Hunt this weekend and explained it to me when I got intrigued. She shared a few of the past puzzles with me so I could get a sense of what it was like, and then I got hooked. We got to chatting more about riddles we’d enjoyed as kids and spent a while trading ones back and forth about people found dead in various places and having to figure out why. It felt nice to kick it old-school style with just puzzles and human interaction!

2016 Blogging Initiative, Week 1

By Kristina

onegoodthing

Option 1: We rarely take the time to stop and smell the roses. Even on the most disastrous of days, good things happen. And these good things, when you’re on the lookout for them, pop up. All. The. Time. So for one day (heck, do it for many days), keep a lookout for the small good moments during your day and blog about them. We bet that by keeping an eye out for the good, your whole day will be even better!

2016-01-12 19.08.39 My one good thing! He’s overseeing my blogging from his “office.”

I’m in the home stretch of maternity leave with my son Parker, so as much as I wanted to share what a day looks like for me teaching math and being an IB coordinator, it feels weird trying to recreate that when I haven’t been in the classroom since June 25, 2015. In the throes of the newborn stage, I quickly realized that there is no “leave” in maternity leave. I missed school–not only the familiar faces and routines but also the feeling of being competent. As a student and as a runner, I’ve previously been able to achieve good grades and better race times. With a known input comes a known output.

But with motherhood, like teaching before it, I have felt so deskilled in that putting hard work in doesn’t necessarily yield a desired result. It’s been a humbling journey, and though each day brings new challenges, I’m starting to find my footing. Over the past few months, I have grown by leaps and bounds since that first day home with Parker (when my husband and I put the car seat down on our floor for the very first time and wondered “how did the hospital let us out when we know *nothing*?”). I feel more confident with taking him out, with soothing him, with feeling like a mom, and with knowing him and his quirks. I cherish our snuggles, outings to baby lapsit, long walks, and co-cooking sessions (when he oversees me from his lion seat). Watching him grow and learn is amazing. Laughs, rolling, grasping, and getting closer to sitting up are all so cool to see.

That leads me to the overall “one good thing” of this post. Being at home with Parker and enjoying these small moments is helping me be patient with where I am rather than always worrying about not doing enough. When I got pregnant, I knew that teaching would become very different as I took on the new role of mom. However, I kept up my old habits and work style right up until the summer because I just wasn’t ready to let go of them and change. Throughout maternity leave, I’ve worried about forgetting how to teach, about my school not needing me anymore, and about how I was going to handle work if Parker still woke up multiple times a night to feed. Recently, I finally started to change my mindset about the onset of work. My brain sometimes still thinks it needs to go into panicky worry mode before every start of school, even though it doesn’t need to do it anymore.

Life will be okay if I’m reasonable about setting my bars for success. For instance, I recently ran without RunKeeper or music and just set out to enjoy the run without setting a pace goal. I could have gone into it saying “well, you *already* failed because you also didn’t double up and do a barre class today” or “if you don’t go faster than your last run, you’ve failed” or “you’re not running five miles at a time yet? FAILED!” Instead I just enjoyed the balmy weather, quiet Tufts campus, and feeling happy for having gone on a run at all. Teaching is going to be fine. It’ll be a tough adjustment, much as getting used to maternity leave was, but I’ll be able to handle it.

the new teacher down the hall

By Kristina

I may be psychic.

Just kidding, I’m not turning in my teacher hat to become the next Miss Cleo.

I expressed yesterday how much I wished that BPS students would come back to teach in their communities. This would be so much more meaningful than recruiting more Teach for America folk, for reasons very well said in this article by Valerie Strauss. For one, “the organization’s facile circumvention of the grinding, difficult, but profoundly empowering work of teaching and administering schools has created the illusion that there are quick fixes, not only for failing schools but for deeply entrenched patterns of poverty and inequality.” Bringing bright young college graduates to urban public school systems can be quite informative and culturally eye-opening, but it’s a superficial fix akin to painting concealer on a zit and expecting it to go away. Furthermore, TFA often serves as a “pathway to wealth and power for those already privileged in the rapidly expanding educational-industrial complex, which already offers numerous careers for the ambitious and well-connected.” I hate when teaching in urban schools is treated like a stepping stone or “street cred” to collect before founding an educational technology startup or heading off to business school. What a terrible message to convey to our students, to other teachers, and to prospective teachers–that teaching isn’t enough.

Teaching proved to be enough for me today. Reading down the list of new staff, I came up on the name of a student who I had taught as a senior during my first year of teaching (2008-2009). He’s coming to the school to teach 8th grade math. So proud of him and of our school community.

Photo Credit: http://withfriendship.com/user/neeha/miss_cleo.php